except for... /-/ Zabaglione with toasted pistachio short bread crumble



It must be confusing that food is one of those things that are filled with hypocritical thought and contradiction. Normally these traits are frowned down upon but in food, it is appears not to matter at all. Some things are normal like the mixed reports in health food and our health (red wine and chocolate is good still?) However I am referring to the first world problem of having too much good food and still wanting to have it all.




Don’t love nuts but can eat a palate full of satay chicken with chunky ass peanut sauce? Not uncommon in my world of student meals and late night snacking. 




Cannot stand to drink milk but panna cotta, traditional custard and malted milk are your go to desserts? Sure why not, it is not weird.




Squid ink got you down but squid ink pasta, risotto and pesto high on your gourmet must eat list?

Even the most obvious ones like pumpkin soup ( hate pumpkin), Runny egg lover (hate other forms of eggs) are common in the world of food. For me I cannot stomach parmesan cheese on a cheese board or in it raw form; however place it in a salad, pizza, soup or on bread and I am the first to take a bite. This comes from a girl who would eat cheese night and day until she got dairy sickness then keep eating. Sorry nutritionist, the K proteins have me addicted and I am fully giving in. 


 

More I think about it why is being a hypocritical so bad? I am one and I am not ashamed of it. No it is not that trend where calling yourself a b!tch is “cool” or being outrageously vulgar is the normal part of becoming an adult (Looking at you miss Cyrus and inmate Justin.B)

In world where we accept that things are not black and white, but are unlimited shades of grey; I am sure we can open our minds to discover that everyone is has a bit of hypocritical thought in them. At least there would be one less insult in the world.




Today the only skills needed to make this dessert is the ability to use a pot, a whisk and boil water. Zabaglione has to one of those dessert that are harder to pronounce (and spell!) than it is to make. Also the list of ingredients is minimal for an impressive dinner time finisher. Trust me, I am not a doctor. It makes you seem like you know your gelato from your ice cream (actually found out there is a difference….)





Anyway from a person who adores dairy desserts this is a refreshing creamy change. The use of eggs, sugar and marsala is traditionally the only three ingredients you need in Zabaglione. Really it is only one step and you have a creamy, airy dessert which tastes like you have been kissed by your custard. So instead of being crawling and heavy, the egg “custard” is incredibly easy to eat even after a heavy meal. With this instead of almonds in amaretti cookies I used toasted ground pistachios which deliver that prized pistachio taste most of us love. Fragrant, toasty, and inviting change to traditional cookie but can be used interchangeably in this dessert. I know Italians are hesitant to change but really this tiny change will not hurt. 





Zabaglione with toasted pistachio short bread crumble

Makes 6 dessert cups

Short bread Barely adapted from Dave Lieberman



200g ground pistachio, toasted
140g plain flour
2g baking powder
2g salt
125g unsalted butter
80g caster sugar
1 egg
1 vanilla bean

Mix flour, ground pistachios, baking powder and salt. Set aisde.

Beat the butter and caster sugar in a stand mixer for 5 minutes until well creamed. Add egg and beat again. Fold in flour mixture into the butter until well mixed. Divide mixture into two and fridge for 30 minutes.

Pre heat oven to 180

On a well-floured bench roll out with a rolling pin to 3mm thick and cut out with a 4cm cookie cutter. Place a lined baking tray and poke with a fork.

Bake at 180c for 10 minutes and allow to cool on trays. Store in an air tight box for up to one week.


Zabaglione
From Channel4


8 eggs
100g caster sugar
100ml marsala
1 vanilla pod, scraped
Crushed pistachio biscuits

 

Put egg yolks, vanilla bean scrapings and sugar in a large glass bowl over a pot of simmering water. Using a balloon whisk, whisk the mixture vigorously until it become a creamy emulsion (thick egg foam)

Once it reaches this stage, add marsala and whisk. Remove from heat then continue to whisk until cool.

Divide into your glasses. Sprinkle the crushed short bread and chill in fridge for 30 minutes. Serve with shortbread.

2 comments:

  1. This will make a perfect pie-crust, too I think (speaking from someone who's never done a cookie pie-crust)...

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    Replies
    1. Yep yep, you got it right!

      I am using it soon for a cookie pie recipe coming up; stay tuned!

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